MECHANICAL & AEROSPACE ENGINEERING, SEOUL NATIONAL UNIVERSITY

Principal Investigator

Do-Nyun Kim Associate Professor

김도년

Do-Nyun Kim Associate Professor

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seoul National University

  • Office : Building 301, Room 1516
  • Phone : +82-2-880-1647
  • E-mail : dnkim@snu.ac.kr
Education
2005.09 - 2009.05
Ph.D., Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Thesis: Contributions to the anisotropic elasto~plastic analysis of shells
Supervisor: Professor Klaus~Jürgen Bathe
2000.03 - 2002.02
M.S., Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University
1996.03 - 2000.02
B.S., Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University
Experience
2017.03 - present
Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seoul National University
2013.03 - 2017.02
Assistant Professor, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University
2009.06 - 2013.01
Postdoctoral Associate, Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
2002.09 - 2005.06
Instructor, Department of Aerosapce Engineering, Korea Air Force Academy
Biographical Information

Dr. Do-Nyun Kim has received his bachelor's (2000) and master's (2002) degrees from Seoul National University. He worked as a full-time lecturer at the Korea Air Force Academy from 2002 to 2005. After he received the Ph.D. (2009) in the department of mechanical engineering at MIT, he worked as a postdoctoral associate in the department of biological engineering at MIT. He joined as a faculty member in the department of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Seoul National University in 2013. His research fields are structural analysis and design based on computational mechanics with experties on the finite element method. In recent years, he has focused on the design and analysis of mechanical meta-materials and DNA-based nanostructures as well as the development of multi-scale and multi-physics modeling and analysis techniques to efficiently simulate the complex mechanical behavior of structures in various physical systems.